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    • ISSN: 2010-0264
    • Frequency: Bimonthly (2010-2014); Monthly (Since 2015)
    • DOI: 10.18178/IJESD
    • Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Richard Haynes
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Editor-in-chief
The University of Queensland, Australia
It is my honor to be the editor-in-chief of IJESD. The journal publishes good papers in the field of environmental science and development.
IJESD 2013 Vol.4(5): 483-487 ISSN: 2010-0264
DOI: 10.7763/IJESD.2013.V4.399

Treatment of Landfill Leachate Using Ganoderma Australe Mycelia Immobilized on Ecomat

Noorlidah Abdullah, Wan Razarinah W. A. R., Noor Zalina Mahmood, and Rosna Mat Taha
Abstract—Biological processes have been proven to be efficient in treating landfill leachates. In this study, treatment of landfill leachate by Ecomat-immobilized mycelia of Ganoderma australe packed in a column was investigated. Continuous recycling of leachate at a constant flow (20 ml/min) was operated for 10 cycles to facilitate biological reactions. Diluted leachate (50%) and raw leachate (100%) were tested for comparison of efficiency of treatment. The results showed that biological oxygen demand (BOD5) was not removed for diluted leachate and a slight removal of 0.14 and 1.72% for raw leachate after cycles 4 and 10, respectively. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal occurred after each cycle with diluted leachate demonstrating higher removal compared to raw leachate. The highest percentage of COD removal of 51.62% for diluted leachate and 22.79% for raw leachate were achieved after the tenth cycle. Ecomat-immobilized mycelium of Ganoderma australe could also reduce ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) exhibiting highest reduction of 45.95% and 30.90% after cycle 8 for diluted and raw leachate, respectively. These findings suggested that a white rot fungus, G. australe has the ability to be considered as potential candidate in landfill leachate treatment.

Index Terms—Fungal enzymes, ammoniacal nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand, biological treatment, white-rot fungi.

Noorlidah Abdullah and Noor Zalina Mahamood are with the Mushroom Research Centre (MRC), Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (e-mail: noorlidah@um.edu.my, email: alin@um.edu.my).
Wan Razarinah W. A. R. is with University of Technology MARA, Faculty of Applied Sciences, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia (email: razarina408@salam.uitm.edu.my).
Rosna Mat Taha is with Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (email: rosna@um.edu.my).

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Cite:Noorlidah Abdullah, Wan Razarinah W. A. R., Noor Zalina Mahmood, and Rosna Mat Taha, "Treatment of Landfill Leachate Using Ganoderma Australe Mycelia Immobilized on Ecomat," International Journal of Environmental Science and Development vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 483-487, 2013.

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